Yearly Archives: 2020

  1. Concussions: they’re not just for athletes

    Contributions by: Megan Otto & Amanda Whalen, PT, DPT

    When someone hears the word “concussion” their thoughts may immediately jump to a young athlete, maybe a soccer or football player, who has sustained a hard blow to their head in a game or during practice. But concussions aren’t just injuries that athletes endure. Older adults are also a large population who are prone to suffering from concussions.

    A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) that is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head. Concussions can also be caused by indirect force to the head, such as a fall or a blow to the body that causes the head to move rapidly back and forth.

    Concussions are often missed or even misdiagnosed among older adults, so caregivers and family need to be on high alert for signs and symptoms. Most concussions seen in older adults are related to an injury from a fall. PRN physical therapist, Amanda Whalen, suggests that older adults often do not mention falls to others or they may not verbalize the symptoms they are suffering from.

    Being aware of concussion signs and symptoms is critical to catching a concussion, which is often a missed injury as you cannot physically “see” it. There are four key categories that concussion symptoms are often grouped in, and they are depicted in the chart below:

    Physical Psychological Emotional Sleep
    • Headaches
    • Dizziness
    • Balance problems
    • Nausea
    • Vision issues
    • Noise and light sensitivity
    • Eye strain
    • Feeling tired or having no energy
    • Concentration issues
    • Difficulty remembering new information
    • Difficulty thinking clearly
    • Irritability
    • Sadness
    • More emotional
    • Anxiety or nervousness
    • Sleeping more than usual
    • Sleeping less than usual
    • Trouble falling asleep

    Typically, a concussion will heal within seven to 10 days. But if the signs and symptoms noted above are missed and trauma to the brain continues, treatment and concussion recovery can take much longer. Thankfully, physical therapy can help!

    Individuals suffering from concussions can find that physical therapy treatment can help relieve symptoms and be beneficial to recover.

    “When a patient suffering from a concussion comes in for treatment, balance is a big thing that we work on,” says Whalen, PT. “We also work on the neck to relax guarded muscles and make sure that joints are moving properly. All of these affect balance and other typical day-to-day activities, like driving or going to school.”

    Low impact activities, like walking or riding a stationary bike, are also proven to help those recovering from a concussion get back to normal. But not all activities are beneficial. Those involving technology, such as watching TV, working on a computer or staring at a phone screen, can have a big impact on the return to normalcy and can prolong symptoms. This is an important reminder for individuals who may be bored during recovery technology is not always our friend!

    Whether you or a loved one has suffered from a concussion before, the most important thing to remember is that if any of the symptoms of a concussion are being experienced, you should tell someone. Listening to your body is so important, especially with concussions as putting off treatment can prolong recovery.

    “You have to be aware that this (a concussion) is not just going to affect your next week, it is going to affect you for the next year if you don’t take care of it,” says Whalen. “The more trauma, the more blunt forces to the head or falls that you have, it is going to be detrimental to your brain health as well.”

    If you or someone you know has recently had trauma to the head and is experiencing any signs and symptoms of a concussion, we urge you to reach out to your physical therapist for treatment. Concussions are often overlooked as they are an injury that cannot be seen, but physical therapy can aid in and accelerate recovery. You can find your nearest clinic location here.

    Special thanks to Amanda Whalen, PT, DPT, from our sister location PRN in La Jolla, California.

  2. Maintaining a healthy work-life balance during the COVID-19 pandemic: Tips on setting boundaries and incorporating physical activity into your everyday routine

    Contributions by: Megan Otto & Reece Jensen, DPT, OCS

    The line between work and home life has blurred over the past few months as many individuals have transitioned to working from home as a safety measure to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This “new normal” brings new challenges as well — such as learning when and how to turn off the work switch when your office is now a part of your home.

    Maintaining a healthy work and life balance has been a constant struggle for individuals in the workforce, but many have experienced added stress since they’ve begun to work from home. A lack of a work and life balance can be detrimental to the body and lead to increased fatigue, poor overall health and a loss of time with family and loved ones.

    “If work stress is not balanced and negated with exercise, rest or recreation, we tend to develop conditions that are bad for our health: tension headaches, bad digestion, low energy levels and poor sleep,” says Reece Jensen, DPT, OCS and a physical therapist with 30 years of experience. “These symptoms can occur, along with increased family or relationship stress.”

    Setting limits such as scheduling specific work hours during the day and turning off your phone or computer after work, can help combat work stress. Learning to say “no” and detaching from work are also good boundaries to set.

    It is also critical that you take time to care for yourself, both physically and mentally. Physical therapy is one way to make time for yourself and promote balance in your life. Physical therapy can teach healthy stretches and exercise routines to help improve body performance and prevent future injuries. Additionally, stretching and physical activity help burn off the physiological damage that can build up from stressful days at work.

    Jensen suggests that managing stress is just another facet of physical therapy and rehabilitation.

    “Life is about stress and there is no way around it. Having zero stress is actually more stressful and can be unhealthy,” says Jensen. “There is good, positive stress like motivation, desire, goal achievement and performance, as well as bad, negative stress like tension, frustration, fatigue, boredom, fear and personal safety. As physical therapists, we help teach patients to manage the negative stress and establish routines that promote good, positive stress.”

    Stretching and physical activity force the body to focus on proper breathing which helps to reduce stress in the body. Specifically, stretching helps to reduce tension in muscles that have tightened under stress, which often occurs when sitting at a desk all day. Meanwhile, aerobic exercise for as little as 20 minutes a day has been shown to reduce stress, improve your mood, reduce symptoms of depression and lower cardiac risk factors.

    Ultimately, it’s up to you to put methods into place to help achieve a healthy balance between work and home life and lower stress. But, don’t be afraid to reach out to your physical therapist for help. Whether you decide to add in a morning stretch or an evening workout to your daily routine, your physical therapist can guide you in what may be best for your body and help you achieve your desired work-life balance!

    Special thanks to Reece Jensen, DPT, OCS, from our sister location PRN Physical & Hand Therapy in Encinitas, California.

    If you are experiencing pain or increased stress, give us a call today! Our trusted physical therapists are here to help you manage any aches and pains related to maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

  3. Breaking News: PTs, OTs, and SLPs Deemed Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers

    (Blog article is sourced from WebPt.com – click here to learn more about WebPT)

    On March 19, the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) of the US Department of Homeland Security issued a memorandum and associated guidance designating physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists as “essential critical infrastructure workers.”

    According to the official guidance, which is intended to help state and local officials make safe and prudent decisions for the health and safety of their communities in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, “If you work in a critical infrastructure industry, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as healthcare services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule.”

    Furthermore, the guidance promotes “the ability of such workers to continue to work during periods of community restriction, access management, social distancing, or closure orders/directives,” as their job functions are “crucial to community resilience and continuity of essential functions.”

    However, the release emphasizes that the list of essential workers “is advisory in nature” and that it “is not, nor should it be considered to be, a federal directive or standard in and of itself.” Again, it is intended to help guide decisions at the state, local, tribal, and territorial levels, as these governing bodies are “ultimately in charge of implementing and executing response activities in communities under their jurisdiction, while the Federal Government is in a supporting role.”

    Additionally, the guidance encourages workers to perform their jobs remotely whenever possible, stating that “in-person, non-mandatory activities should be delayed until the resumption of normal operations.”

    See the full memorandum, guidance, and list of essential critical infrastructure workers here. We’ll continue to provide updates specific to the rehab therapy industry as more details emerge.

  4. How To Get A Doctorate In Physical Therapy

    Woman reading about orthopedic physical therapy in a doctorate program

    What Does A Doctorate In Physical Therapy Entail?

    If you’ve always been interested in caring for people, becoming a physical therapist may be the perfect job for you. Each day you’d get to work with clients and help them recover from injuries, surgery, or simply help them develop more strength throughout their body. If this sounds like something you’d like to do, maybe it’s time to get a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. But how in the world does one get to that point of working in orthopedic physical therapy?

    How To Work In The Field Of Orthopedic Physical Therapy

    Physical therapist helping a person stretch their neck

    If you’ve been considering getting a doctorate and becoming a physical therapist but don’t know where to start, have no fear. We’ve got some simple steps you can follow to better understand the process and what it takes to work in a physical therapy clinic. 

    What’s Required?

    In America, it is a requirement to get a doctorate in physical therapy before you’re allowed to practice. But before doing that, you’ll need to obtain your bachelor’s degree, which can take a minimum of 4 years to complete. Once you’ve earned that, you can start the process of applying to physical therapy doctorate programs.

    In order to apply for a master’s program, some schools may require you to take the GRE (Graduate Records Examination). Keep in mind that you’ll need to get certain scores depending on the school you apply to in order to be accepted. It’s important to set aside time to study and refresh your knowledge to score well on this exam. If you’re worried about passing, there are programs available to help people study for the big exam and learn the best test-taking tactics. 

    Getting In

    Person carrying textbooks and a backpack

    Once you’ve taken the GRE and gathered all the extra information consisting of college transcripts and acceptance letters, you can begin the process of applying to a grad school. Getting everything organized and ready to submit can be intimidating. Luckily, the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service has a really helpful check-list you can go through to ensure that you have everything you need to apply. 

    If you’re not sure where to begin applying, here are some of the top schools in the nation for physical therapy to consider: 

    • University of Delaware
    • University of Pittsburgh
    • University of Southern California

    Keep in mind that getting a doctorate in physical therapy will take up to 3 years of schooling. Adding that onto your bachelor’s program, you’re looking at about 7 years of schooling in order to become a physical therapist. 

    Residency

    Student providing physical therapy during their residency

    Following your doctorate program in physical therapy, you’ll need to complete your residency hours. This entails both coursework as well as clinical experiences. This is a wonderful time to get to know your colleagues better, rub shoulders, and learn from the more experienced people in the field to discover a specialty you’d like to focus on.

    Physical therapy is like a large umbrella with a wide variety of specialties underneath it to choose from. If you enjoy working with children, you could enter into a program that focuses on the needs of caring for kids. Another option is specializing in orthopedic physical therapy or sports medicine. The options are endless!

    Whatever you choose, make sure that you enjoy it. If you’re not sure what you want to focus on, ask around. There’s no better way to get a better understanding of what you might enjoy than listening to other people’s experiences. Ask them what they like and dislike about their work and evaluate whether or not you might enjoy that too. A great place to get more information is a physical therapy clinic.

    Get a License

    You’re almost there! You’ve almost completed everything you need to become a physical therapist. In order to perform physical therapy, you have to have a license. Not a driver’s license, a physical therapy license.

    Each state requires a license in order to practice physical therapy and they must be renewed regularly. To get a license, you must take and pass the National Physical Therapy Examination. Once you pass that, you’ll be able to apply for jobs and legally practice physical therapy. 

    Earn Certification

    Person providing pediatric physical therapy

    If you want to specialize even further in your physical therapy practice, you can earn a certification that declares you as an expert in a certain field. Earning a certification isn’t required, but can make you a better candidate for certain jobs.

    In order to get a certification in physical therapy, you have to be licensed as well as having a minimum of 2,000 hours of clinical practice in the specialty area you wish to be certified in. Keep in mind that a quarter of those hours must’ve been completed within the past 3 years. Gaining a certification also requires you to take an exam. If you’re willing to go the extra mile, you could be offered better job opportunities based off of your specialty. Not to mention, it looks great on a resume.

     

     

  5. Physical Therapy And Back Pain

    Image of someone suffering from back pain

    Physical Therapy And Back Pain: How Does It Help?

    Did you know? 

    According to research, back pain is the single leading cause of disability for people worldwide. The unfortunate thing about back pain is that it can really debilitate you from doing normal, everyday things. Our back is a central part of our body and if it’s injured or in pain, it’s really difficult to do much of anything, including restful sleep. 

    If you’ve experienced back pain, you’re not alone.

    Nearly 80% of Americans suffer from back pain at some point in their lives, and it affects people of all ages both young and old.

    Luckily, physical therapy for back pain is a great way to manage discomfort and even help increase the strength in your back to prevent further injury.

    How Physical Therapy Helps Back Pain

    Physical therapy is the best option to help heal your back and help you become pain-free. Below are just some of the ways physical therapy can help relieve your back pain:

    Back Exercises Given by a Physical Therapist

    Woman getting working with a physical therapist to reduce her back pain

    Considering that a physical therapist will spend around 7 years in school, they know a thing or two about healing the body. 

    During a physical therapy appointment, you’ll be shown different stretches and positions that will help aid you in healing your back. The knowledge you gain from your physical therapist is priceless and will benefit you for your entire life.

    Some people think that they can just manage their back with home remedies, and while that can help, it will only work to a degree. 

    Performing at-home exercises without the right knowledge can lead to overstretching which leads to the potential of tweaking your back, causing further injury. A physical therapist will know what your body needs to get better and won’t push you to the point of reinjury. 

    Put your trust in your physical therapist and you’ll be well on your way to a better back.

    Fancy Machinery

    Most people don’t have a physical therapy clinic in their own home, imagine that.

    At home, there’s only so much you can do in terms of stretching and exercises. With the new technology that many physical therapy clinics have, you’ll be able to do so much more than you could at home. 

    A physical therapy office will have every tool and machinery you could possibly imagine to help heal, stretch and strengthen your body. Not to mention, you get the expertise of the physical therapist themselves for a more hands-on technique.

    Types of Back Pain And Services

    Woman suffering from back pain as she works to lift a box

    Back pain can be caused by a number of things. If you work a 9-5 job, you may notice some aches and pains over time in your back. If you’re in an industry that requires you to lift heavy objects, you’ll likely develop pain spots throughout your spine. Even pregnant women have back pain, especially in their lower back. These types of scenarios are fairly easy to fix and manage.

    However, others may struggle with more severe back pain due to a herniated disk or scoliosis. Physical therapy can still help those individuals manage their back pain and regain more comfort in their lives.

    If you’ve ever experienced back pain, Action Potential Physical Therapy offers a variety of programs that cater to your specific needs. Check out these physical therapy programs and see what works best for you: 

    • Women’s Health
    • Back Pain Rehabilitation
    • Job Site Evaluation
    • Spinal Mobilization 
    • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy

    Action Potential Physical Therapy

    Man getting care at a physical therapy clinic

    We have a fantastic team of physical therapists that are ready to provide the best care you deserve.

    With 7 different locations in the Colorado Springs area, you’ll be able to easily find a physical therapy clinic that works for you.

    Take advantage of what’s offered at Action Potential Physical Therapy and schedule your next appointment. We can’t wait to see you!

Security / Fountain

Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday: 7:00am – 5:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • MS Physical Therapy
  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Mark Leenheer PT, DPT, CMPT,

Mark Leenheer graduated from Saint Louis University in 2015 with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Following graduation, Mark completed a post-doctoral residency program with a focus in Orthopaedic Physical Therapy at the Cleveland VA Medical Center. A Certified Manual Physical Therapist through the North American Institute of Orthopaedic Manual Therapy, Mark is currently pursuing his Fellowship in manual physical therapy.  He is a certified practitioner of the Graston Technique, an instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization technique useful for treating myofascial restrictions and soft tissue adhesions, mobilizing scars, and promoting healing. Mark is a Cleveland, OH native and a passionate Cleveland sports fanatic. Additionally, he is a cyclist, skier, and trail runner

Greg Wilhelms PT, CERT.DN

Greg Wilhelms, PT, a longstanding part of the Colorado Springs and Fountain medical community, has been practicing physical therapy for nearly forty years.  Greg holds his Physical Therapy (Degree) Certificate, earned at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA.  Additionally, he has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education, received from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, NE.  Greg’s tenure as a physical therapist has afforded him many opportunities to work in outpatient rehabilitation centers and traditional orthopedic facilities, in acute hospital settings and skilled nursing facilities, and in individual patient homes.  Throughout his career, Greg has continued to fine tune his skills even further by taking over seventy continuing education courses. Greg approaches his physical therapy practice in much the same way he does all things in life, with a relaxed style.  Knowledgeable and highly trained, Greg puts patients at ease as he listens to their concerns, evaluates their condition or injury, and employs the most suitable techniques to remedy the pain and problems. When not working, Greg enjoys spending time with his wife, kids and grand kids, watching sports, and gardening.

Fillmore

Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday: 7:00 am – 5:00pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • MS Physical Therapy
  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Karly Lindroth-Yates PT, DPT

Karly Lindroth-Yates PT, DPT, has been practicing physical therapy for over three years in various settings including travel therapy, outpatient, and inpatient rehab with an emphasis on providing hands on patient centered care. Karly earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology with a minor in coaching and graduated from Clarkson University in New York with her Doctorate of Physical Therapy in 2018. She is compassionate about all patient care and diagnoses in which she he has taken continuing education courses in vestibular rehab, scoliosis, instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization, orthopedic rehab, plus others, and is planning on taking a dry needling course in her pursuit of becoming a generalist who can meet the needs of all her patients with varying diagnoses. Karly believes that physical therapy requires good patient rapport with a clinical approach that involves a balance of prescribing appropriate exercises with manual therapy techniques including soft tissue mobilization, myofascial release, joint mobilization, muscle energy techniques, etc. that will lead to improved functional outcomes and quality of life. Karly is a native of Colorado Springs and loves being back home where she enjoys time with family, friends, and her two dogs, Ollie and Piper. Outside of work she enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing sports.

Cathleen Hixson, PTA, MS, CSCS, ACSM-EP

Cathleen Hixson, PTA, joined the Action Potential team in 2021 after earning her Physical Therapist Assistant A.S. degree with Florida State College at Jacksonville. She holds a B.S. in Exercise Science from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and an M.S. in Kinesiology from A.T. Still University. Cathleen transitioned into physical therapy after a 15-year career in health and fitness, primarily working in military strength and conditioning. Her background in ballet and competitive dance formed her interest in movement and aspiration to help others move well. Cathleen is enjoying getting to know the Colorado Springs area and taking advantage of the hiking, trail running, archery, and snow sports available.

Downtown

Hours:
Mon: 7am-5:30pm, Tue: 7am-5pm, Wed: 7am-6pm, Thu: 7am-5pm, Fri: 7am-4pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Functional Capacity Evaluation
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Hand Therapy
  • Headache Therapy
  • Job Site Evaluation
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Lift Testing / Task & Ability Evaluation
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Splint Custom Fabrication
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Rich Monaco PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, OCS, CERT.DN, DIPMT

Richard Monaco, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, OCS, CERT.DN, DIPMT, obtained his Doctorate of Physical Therapy in 2010 from Nazareth College in Rochester, NY. In addition, he holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology and Exercise Science from SUNY Cortland in Cortland, NY. Rich received his Strength and Conditioning Specialist Certification (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association, he is certified in Trigger Point Dry Needling, and he completed the Certified Orthopedic Manipulative Therapist post-graduate coursework, training, and testing through the Institute of Manipulative Physiotherapy and Clinical Training. Rich most recently completed his National Fellowship Certification. Rich operates from the perspective that physical therapy consists of equal parts manual therapy, for joint and soft tissue mobilization, and appropriate exercises, for maintenance and support. When not working or studying, Rich spends his time with his family and in the outdoors. He enjoys snowboarding, mountain biking, rock and ice climbing, and hiking and backpacking.

Don Bost ATC

Donald Bost, ATC, is a certified athletic trainer and Director of Action Potential’s Industrial Evaluation and Rehabilitation program. Don earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Athletic Training from Fort Lewis College in Durango, CO. Additionally, he studied Exercise Physiology at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL. Don is a member of the National Athletic Training Association and he is certified in the Blankenship Functional Capacity Evaluation System. Don’s breadth of experience in sports performance and worksite safety makes him an invaluable member of the Action Potential team. Prior to joining Action Potential, while with the “At A Glance Corporation,” in Sydney, NY, he was not only integral in helping the company secure a grant to create its Ergonomics Program, but he also then performed the employee ergonomic assessments and conducted worksite safety evaluations. At present, Don not only does ergonomic assessments, worksite evaluations, Functional Capacity Evaluations, and pre-placement screenings, but he also provides outstanding patient care, helping individuals to improve strength and conditioning. Don directs several sports performance programs locally and uses his expertise to help injured athletes return to action more quickly. In his free time, Don enjoys spending time with his wife and their five children.

Sandra Bost OTR, CHT

Sandra Bost, OTR, CHT is an Occupational Therapist and Certified Hand Therapist who has been an integral part of the Action Potential team since 1999. Sandy received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy from the University of Wisconsin Madison in Madison, WI in 1987. In 1994, after successfully completing thousands of hours working specifically with the hands, developing her expertise and honing her specialized skills, she earned the Certified Hand Therapist title. For over twenty years, Sandy has enjoyed treating patients with a variety of conditions affecting the hands and the entire upper quadrant of the body. Sandy has a comfortable and conversational approach, putting patients at ease as she listens to their concerns and employs the most suitable techniques to remedy the problem. As necessary, she creates customized splints to assist in the healing and recovery process. When not working, gardening, participating in and watching sports, and having fun with her family in every way possible top her list of favorite activities.

Briargate

Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday: 7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Hand Therapy
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • Multiple Sclerosis Physical Therapy
  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Splint Custom Fabrication
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Melodie Colyar OTR, CHT

A Certified Hand Therapist for over twenty years, Melodie Colyar OTR, CHT, specializes in the treatment of all aspects of injuries to the upper quadrant. Melodie holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Occupational Therapy from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. Committed to constant professional growth, she has observed hours of hand and upper extremity surgery and has taken countless continuing education courses in order to stay current on surgical procedures and evolving evidence-based practices. She works closely with occupational medicine doctors, family practice physicians and hand surgeons and believes in a team-based approach to care. Melodie asserts that occupational therapy combines the art of rehabilitation with the science of healing and she takes pride in her ability to provide both, realizing the privilege of being a part of the healing process. Outside of work Melodie’s priority is caring for her children and extended family. She is also an avid runner.

Phil Plante PT, DSc, MTC, CMPT, COMT, FAAOMPT

Phil Plante founded Action Potential Physical Therapy in 1997 with the goal of providing world class physical therapy in a local setting. His passion for treating patients in the Colorado Springs community continues to this day. In addition to practicing physical therapy full time, Phil is a Fellow with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Therapists, providing advanced fellowship training to therapists from all over the nation. Phil holds his Doctor of Science in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, MI. Additionally, Phil has the elite title of Certified Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapist (Level 4) through the North American Institute of Orthopaedic Manual Therapists. He has a Master of Arts degree in Sports Science from the University of Denver in Denver, CO as well as a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Rockhurst College in Kansas City, MO. Phil earned his undergraduate degree in Community Health Education from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, CO. In his free time, he enjoys cycling, playing hockey, and fly fishing and relishes spending time with his wife, Eva, and their two daughters.

Suyasha Pai PT, Cert.DN

Suyasha Pai PT, Cert. DN has been a physical therapist for over 13 years. She completed her physical therapy education and training at the Sancheti Institute College of Physical Therapy, an acclaimed school in Pune, India. Her training includes all aspects of orthopedic physical therapy and rehabilitation, shoulder and hand specific rehabilitation, myofascial release and differential diagnosis techniques and skills. Additionally, she is certified in Trigger Point Dry Needling and trained in specialized Vestibular Rehabilitation concepts and practices. Suyasha truly loves working with senior patients and also has a special interest in treating patients with headaches, including migraines, those with TMJ problems and individuals with disorders of the foot and ankle. Throughout her career, Suyasha has been afforded the opportunity to work in diverse settings with a variety of patients. While in India, she worked in a facility specializing in knee rehabilitation, including the prevention of knee surgery and joint replacement. Since moving to the United States in 2007, Suyasha has worked in outpatient rehabilitation centers and traditional orthopedic facilities, in individual patient homes and in the clinical office setting. No matter the setting, she believes that “doing good to others is not just a duty, it is a joy!”  She loves her job and works to bring a smile to every patient she sees. Outside of work, she loves to spend time with her friends, travel the world with her family and enjoy nature. Her hobbies include painting, dancing, singing and listening to music.

Kathryn Livingston PTA

Kathryn Livingston, licensed Physical Therapist Assistant, graduated from Pueblo Community College in 2017 with her Associates of Applied Science degree in Physical Therapy. Always up for a challenge and eager to learn to be the most skilled PTA possible, Kathryn joined Action Potential to work alongside the best. Beyond the traditional PTA curriculum, Kathryn specifically trained in Hippotherapy, the purposeful manipulation of equine movement as a physical and occupational therapy tool to engage sensory, neuro-motor, and cognitive systems, to promote functional outcomes. Working in the clinic without access to horses, Kathryn is committed to helping patients reach their functional and lifestyle goals and draws upon her diverse training and skills to do so, implementing unique evidence-based approaches to care as appropriate. Kathryn loves the fast paced, engaging and fun environment of out-patient physical therapy. She particularly relishes working with patients with sports injuries, those with neurological disorders, and the elderly population in general. Outside of work Kathryn enjoys horseback riding, dirt biking, camping, wakeboarding and any activities that involve being at the lake!

 

Samantha Rodriguez LAT, ATC, PTA

My name is Samantha Rodriguez, I was born and raised in Colorado Springs, Colorado. I graduated from Colorado State University – Pueblo in 2017 with my Bachelors in Athletic Training. I have been a Licensed Athletic Trainer for 3 years and have practiced in both High School and Collegiate settings since 2013 as a student and also a licensed professional covering a wide variety of men’s and women’s sports. I am a recent 2020 graduate from Pueblo Community College with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Physical Therapist Assisting, to which I am currently a Licensed Physical Therapist Assistant. I love sports and competition which is why I chose to pursue Athletic Training. As an Athletic Trainer I found that I not only enjoyed being on the field tending to injuries, but I also enjoyed the rehabilitation process of getting my athletes back to doing what they love. This is when I decided to pursue a career in physical therapy.  There is nothing more rewarding than seeing a person come in at their worst and to be able to help them get back to doing what they love, whether it’s a sport, gardening, playing with grandchildren, or simply gaining their independence back around their home.

Austin Bluffs

Hours:
Mon: 7am-5pm, Tue: 7am-5:30pm, Wed: 7am-5pm, Thu: 7am-5:30pm, Fri: 7am-12pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • MS Physical Therapy

  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: age 6 years+
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Rick Lambert PT, DPT, CERT.DN

Rick Lambert, PT, DPT, CERT.DN, has been practicing physical therapy for 15 years, emphasizing manual therapy, mobilization, manipulation and myofascial release, and exploring the neurophysiology of pain. Rick earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1997. He earned his Master’s Degree in Physical Therapy in 2001, and his Doctorate in Physical Therapy in 2005. Rick’s clinical approach consists of individualized treatment plans with an emphasis on hands-on physical therapy and a good dose of humor. Rick, his wife and their four children are thrilled to live in Colorado Springs and enjoy all the community has to offer. In his free time, he hikes, runs, swims, and travels.