Blog

  1. Breaking News: PTs, OTs, and SLPs Deemed Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers

    (Blog article is sourced from WebPt.com – click here to learn more about WebPT)

    On March 19, the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) of the US Department of Homeland Security issued a memorandum and associated guidance designating physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists as “essential critical infrastructure workers.”

    According to the official guidance, which is intended to help state and local officials make safe and prudent decisions for the health and safety of their communities in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, “If you work in a critical infrastructure industry, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as healthcare services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule.”

    Furthermore, the guidance promotes “the ability of such workers to continue to work during periods of community restriction, access management, social distancing, or closure orders/directives,” as their job functions are “crucial to community resilience and continuity of essential functions.”

    However, the release emphasizes that the list of essential workers “is advisory in nature” and that it “is not, nor should it be considered to be, a federal directive or standard in and of itself.” Again, it is intended to help guide decisions at the state, local, tribal, and territorial levels, as these governing bodies are “ultimately in charge of implementing and executing response activities in communities under their jurisdiction, while the Federal Government is in a supporting role.”

    Additionally, the guidance encourages workers to perform their jobs remotely whenever possible, stating that “in-person, non-mandatory activities should be delayed until the resumption of normal operations.”

    See the full memorandum, guidance, and list of essential critical infrastructure workers here. We’ll continue to provide updates specific to the rehab therapy industry as more details emerge.

  2. How To Get A Doctorate In Physical Therapy

    Woman reading about orthopedic physical therapy in a doctorate program

    What Does A Doctorate In Physical Therapy Entail?

    If you’ve always been interested in caring for people, becoming a physical therapist may be the perfect job for you. Each day you’d get to work with clients and help them recover from injuries, surgery, or simply help them develop more strength throughout their body. If this sounds like something you’d like to do, maybe it’s time to get a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. But how in the world does one get to that point of working in orthopedic physical therapy?

    How To Work In The Field Of Orthopedic Physical Therapy

    Physical therapist helping a person stretch their neck

    If you’ve been considering getting a doctorate and becoming a physical therapist but don’t know where to start, have no fear. We’ve got some simple steps you can follow to better understand the process and what it takes to work in a physical therapy clinic. 

    What’s Required?

    In America, it is a requirement to get a doctorate in physical therapy before you’re allowed to practice. But before doing that, you’ll need to obtain your bachelor’s degree, which can take a minimum of 4 years to complete. Once you’ve earned that, you can start the process of applying to physical therapy doctorate programs.

    In order to apply for a master’s program, some schools may require you to take the GRE (Graduate Records Examination). Keep in mind that you’ll need to get certain scores depending on the school you apply to in order to be accepted. It’s important to set aside time to study and refresh your knowledge to score well on this exam. If you’re worried about passing, there are programs available to help people study for the big exam and learn the best test-taking tactics. 

    Getting In

    Person carrying textbooks and a backpack

    Once you’ve taken the GRE and gathered all the extra information consisting of college transcripts and acceptance letters, you can begin the process of applying to a grad school. Getting everything organized and ready to submit can be intimidating. Luckily, the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service has a really helpful check-list you can go through to ensure that you have everything you need to apply. 

    If you’re not sure where to begin applying, here are some of the top schools in the nation for physical therapy to consider: 

    • University of Delaware
    • University of Pittsburgh
    • University of Southern California

    Keep in mind that getting a doctorate in physical therapy will take up to 3 years of schooling. Adding that onto your bachelor’s program, you’re looking at about 7 years of schooling in order to become a physical therapist. 

    Residency

    Student providing physical therapy during their residency

    Following your doctorate program in physical therapy, you’ll need to complete your residency hours. This entails both coursework as well as clinical experiences. This is a wonderful time to get to know your colleagues better, rub shoulders, and learn from the more experienced people in the field to discover a specialty you’d like to focus on.

    Physical therapy is like a large umbrella with a wide variety of specialties underneath it to choose from. If you enjoy working with children, you could enter into a program that focuses on the needs of caring for kids. Another option is specializing in orthopedic physical therapy or sports medicine. The options are endless!

    Whatever you choose, make sure that you enjoy it. If you’re not sure what you want to focus on, ask around. There’s no better way to get a better understanding of what you might enjoy than listening to other people’s experiences. Ask them what they like and dislike about their work and evaluate whether or not you might enjoy that too. A great place to get more information is a physical therapy clinic.

    Get a License

    You’re almost there! You’ve almost completed everything you need to become a physical therapist. In order to perform physical therapy, you have to have a license. Not a driver’s license, a physical therapy license.

    Each state requires a license in order to practice physical therapy and they must be renewed regularly. To get a license, you must take and pass the National Physical Therapy Examination. Once you pass that, you’ll be able to apply for jobs and legally practice physical therapy. 

    Earn Certification

    Person providing pediatric physical therapy

    If you want to specialize even further in your physical therapy practice, you can earn a certification that declares you as an expert in a certain field. Earning a certification isn’t required, but can make you a better candidate for certain jobs.

    In order to get a certification in physical therapy, you have to be licensed as well as having a minimum of 2,000 hours of clinical practice in the specialty area you wish to be certified in. Keep in mind that a quarter of those hours must’ve been completed within the past 3 years. Gaining a certification also requires you to take an exam. If you’re willing to go the extra mile, you could be offered better job opportunities based off of your specialty. Not to mention, it looks great on a resume.

     

     

  3. Physical Therapy And Back Pain

    Image of someone suffering from back pain

    Physical Therapy And Back Pain: How Does It Help?

    Did you know? 

    According to research, back pain is the single leading cause of disability for people worldwide. The unfortunate thing about back pain is that it can really debilitate you from doing normal, everyday things. Our back is a central part of our body and if it’s injured or in pain, it’s really difficult to do much of anything, including restful sleep. 

    If you’ve experienced back pain, you’re not alone.

    Nearly 80% of Americans suffer from back pain at some point in their lives, and it affects people of all ages both young and old.

    Luckily, physical therapy for back pain is a great way to manage discomfort and even help increase the strength in your back to prevent further injury.

    How Physical Therapy Helps Back Pain

    Physical therapy is the best option to help heal your back and help you become pain-free. Below are just some of the ways physical therapy can help relieve your back pain:

    Back Exercises Given by a Physical Therapist

    Woman getting working with a physical therapist to reduce her back pain

    Considering that a physical therapist will spend around 7 years in school, they know a thing or two about healing the body. 

    During a physical therapy appointment, you’ll be shown different stretches and positions that will help aid you in healing your back. The knowledge you gain from your physical therapist is priceless and will benefit you for your entire life.

    Some people think that they can just manage their back with home remedies, and while that can help, it will only work to a degree. 

    Performing at-home exercises without the right knowledge can lead to overstretching which leads to the potential of tweaking your back, causing further injury. A physical therapist will know what your body needs to get better and won’t push you to the point of reinjury. 

    Put your trust in your physical therapist and you’ll be well on your way to a better back.

    Fancy Machinery

    Most people don’t have a physical therapy clinic in their own home, imagine that.

    At home, there’s only so much you can do in terms of stretching and exercises. With the new technology that many physical therapy clinics have, you’ll be able to do so much more than you could at home. 

    A physical therapy office will have every tool and machinery you could possibly imagine to help heal, stretch and strengthen your body. Not to mention, you get the expertise of the physical therapist themselves for a more hands-on technique.

    Types of Back Pain And Services

    Woman suffering from back pain as she works to lift a box

    Back pain can be caused by a number of things. If you work a 9-5 job, you may notice some aches and pains over time in your back. If you’re in an industry that requires you to lift heavy objects, you’ll likely develop pain spots throughout your spine. Even pregnant women have back pain, especially in their lower back. These types of scenarios are fairly easy to fix and manage.

    However, others may struggle with more severe back pain due to a herniated disk or scoliosis. Physical therapy can still help those individuals manage their back pain and regain more comfort in their lives.

    If you’ve ever experienced back pain, Action Potential Physical Therapy offers a variety of programs that cater to your specific needs. Check out these physical therapy programs and see what works best for you: 

    • Women’s Health
    • Back Pain Rehabilitation
    • Job Site Evaluation
    • Spinal Mobilization 
    • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy

    Action Potential Physical Therapy

    Man getting care at a physical therapy clinic

    We have a fantastic team of physical therapists that are ready to provide the best care you deserve.

    With 7 different locations in the Colorado Springs area, you’ll be able to easily find a physical therapy clinic that works for you.

    Take advantage of what’s offered at Action Potential Physical Therapy and schedule your next appointment. We can’t wait to see you!

  4. 5 Holiday Giving Options Offering Healthful Returns

    The Holiday Season is a time for giving, and that includes supporting causes and organizations that make our communities stronger.

    It’s in this spirit that we share some holiday giving suggestions that offer a more healthful return than simply writing a check.

    After all, as physical therapists, it’s our goal to improve lives and the community by helping people move better and live healthier, more active lives.

    It’s based on this that we thought to offer some ideas for how people can give back to their communities while, at the same time, also benefiting from various levels of physical activity.

    Increase Joy, Reduce Stress

    Such an approach to holiday giving isn’t just about contributing to one’s 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week, as recommended by the Department of Health and Human Services.

    The holidays are a pretty stressful time for a lot of people, and exercise is a proven way to reduce stress and anxiety while improving overall happiness. It just so happens giving and volunteering provide similar health benefits.

    Put them together, and you’re likely to experience a more joyful and relaxing holiday season.”

    With this in mind, consider following five ways to give back and be fit this Holiday Season:

    Volunteer ‘Sweat Equity’

    There are lots of ways to volunteer during the holidays, and many involve various levels of physical activity.

    Collecting gift donations for a local children’s charity, for instance, or helping sort and deliver food donations for a food pantry, requires time, muscle and (if it’s a charitable year) good endurance.

    Do a Charity Fun Run

    Running continues to grow in popularity, and so do charity fun runs – even during the colder months of the year.

    Registration for these runs typically goes to local charities, and some allow for added individual or team fundraising so you can maximize your donation.

    Check your local event calendar for options.

    Lend a Neighbor a Hand

    Most of us have neighbors who could use a helping hand on occasion, be they elderly, disabled, alone, or short on time or money.

    The holidays are a great time to check in with them and see if they could use some help with physical tasks like yard work, clearing the driveway of snow or ice, putting out Christmas decorations, or even childcare.

    Walk Your Best Friends

    Are animals your passion? Perfect! Animals need exercise just like people do, and most animal shelters welcome volunteers eager to play with and walk the dogs and cats.

    Not only is walking great exercise for both people and pets, but spending time with animals can also lower stress and blood pressure.

    Arm Your Smartphone

    If the interpersonal aspect of volunteering doesn’t quite fit your personality, you still have options.

    Some smartphone apps exist (Charity Miles is the most prominent) that allow you to convert workout miles and/or daily activity into donations to reputable nonprofit organizations.

    Of course, if one or more of these ideas sound appealing, but discomfort, pain or a movement limitation is holding you back from giving back in this way, come by the physical therapy clinic.

    At our clinic, we can assess the issue and put you on a path toward being more active – both physically and as a contributor to your community.

  5. Can Exercise Ward Off Cold and Flu Symptoms?

    As cold and flu season approaches, so does the season of illness prevention.

    From getting flu shots to adding a little extra Vitamin C to our diets, prevention often becomes a focus for those concerned with getting sick, missing work and/or school, and optimizing the joy of their upcoming Holiday Seasons.

    It’s based on this mindset that medical professionals such as physical therapists are most likely to get some version of the question: Can exercise boost my immune system?

    The answer, however, is broader than the question itself.

    Boosting the Immune System

    On a more general level, healthy living is the true key to building and maintaining a strong immune system. Habits like eating right, staying hydrated, getting plenty of sleep, and reducing stress account for some long-lasting, immune-boosting benefits.

    But, regular exercise definitely plays an important role, as well.

    Some studies have shown, for instance, that exercise on its own can play a role in reducing the length and intensity of colds and flu. Such research often points to many of the benefits inherent in regular fitness routines as factors that also help ward off illness:

    • Weight management
    • Lower blood pressure
    • Reduction in stress
    • Improved circulation

    Other studies have concluded that regular, mild-intensity exercise can help reduce illness while prolonged, high-intensity exercise can have the opposite effect by making one more susceptible to catching a bug.

    Based on this, if you feel you may be catching something – a cold, a flu or whatever may be going around – the best initial advice is to pull back on the length and intensity of their exercise routine just to be on the safe side.

    Keep getting your exercise, but also take greater care to make sure you’re staying hydrated, eating well and giving your body time to recover.

    If you do get sick?

    According to advice from the Mayo Clinic, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t continue to exercise. They offer the following two rules of thumb:

    The Neck Rule

    If you catch a cold and find that all the symptoms are concentrated above the neck (i.e., nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing and/or a minor sore throat), it’s typically OK to exercise. Simply reduce your intensity. Instead of going for a jog, for instance, opt to go for a walk.

    In contrast, if you find that you’re experiencing symptoms below the neck – things like a congested chest, a hacking cough or an upset stomach – it’s best to not exercise at all.

    The Fever Rule

    Also, if you have a fever or are experience muscle aches and fatigue throughout your body, take a break from exercising. Instead, get some rest, stay hydrated and, if things don’t improve over a couple of days, visit your doctor.

    The bottom line: it’s always your best bet to listen to your body, and don’t overdo it. Pushing your body too hard when it’s fighting an illness could potentially do you more harm than good.

  6. I Stand Corrected! 5 Common Fitness Myths

    When only one in three adults get the recommended amount of physical activity their bodies need each week (according to the President’s Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition), it’s difficult for we as physical therapists to find fault when an individual is making an effort to exercise … even if the effort’s slightly misguided.

    But since October is National Physical Therapy Month, and physical therapists are the medical community’s preeminent experts in movement, fitness, and musculoskeletal function and injury, we view this month as an opportune time to correct what we see as a few common misconceptions about exercise.

    Good Intentions

    Some of the more common personal goals people make revolve around health, fitness and weight loss, and we as physical therapists are dedicated to supporting these goals through a number of individualized services.

    In doing so, though, it’s important to us that people work toward these objectives in a safe and healthful manner – one which most efficiently moves them toward their goals.

    In this spirit, here are five exercise myths we finds to be common among many fitness-minded people:

    1) Stretching Before Exercise Prevents Injuries

    Perhaps surprisingly, research suggests there’s no connection between pre-workout stretching and injury prevention. In addition, stretching before an activity or competition can actually weaken performance.

    So instead, warm up dynamically before a workout by walking, jogging, doing lunges and leg/arm swings, etc.

    Stretching is still incredibly important, but do your stretches independent of your workouts.

    2) The More, the Better

    For the more goal-driven crowd, a pedal-to-the-metal approach to fitness can seem the quickest and most efficient way to better health.

    However, it’s critical workout intensity and length remain in line with one’s current fitness levels and limits.

    It’s also important to schedule recovery, or off-days, into your routine. Failing to do so can increase your injury risk as well as the risk of burnout.

    3) Cross Training is for Athletes Only

    Cross training is simply working activities into your regimen that differ from your preferred or usual activities. The goal is to improve your overall fitness level by challenging your cardio, strength and balance in different ways.

    Such “training diversification” will help maximize your workout potential while helping to prevent overuse injuries and burnout, so everyone should do it.

    4) Aerobic is More Important Than Strength Training

    Whether it’s because some are concerned about too much “bulking up” or they feel spending their limited time on ellipticals and stationary bikes will maximize their efforts, cardio is often a focus for those seeking to improve health.

    It shouldn’t be the only focus, however.

    Muscular fitness is just as important as cardio for such issues as weight management, bone health, injury prevention, and so on.

    5) If Sore or Injured, Rest is Always Best

    Wrong again.

    While rest has a long history as a go-to response to soreness, pain and injury, research now suggests movement and “active recovery” can actually speed up the healing process, specifically when guided by a physical therapist.

    If pain or injury is keeping you from getting a full dose of exercise and physical activity each week, visit a physical therapist.

    Highly educated and licensed health care professionals, physical therapists like those at our clinic are experts at helping people reduce pain, improve/restore mobility, and ultimately lead more healthful, active lives.

Security / Fountain

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • MS Physical Therapy
  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Greg Wilhelms PT, CERT.DN

Greg Wilhelms, PT, a longstanding part of the Colorado Springs and Fountain medical community, has been practicing physical therapy for nearly forty years.  Greg holds his Physical Therapy (Degree) Certificate, earned at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA.  Additionally, he has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education, received from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, NE.  Greg’s tenure as a physical therapist has afforded him many opportunities to work in outpatient rehabilitation centers and traditional orthopedic facilities, in acute hospital settings and skilled nursing facilities, and in individual patient homes.  Throughout his career, Greg has continued to fine tune his skills even further by taking over seventy continuing education courses. Greg approaches his physical therapy practice in much the same way he does all things in life, with a relaxed style.  Knowledgeable and highly trained, Greg puts patients at ease as he listens to their concerns, evaluates their condition or injury, and employs the most suitable techniques to remedy the pain and problems. When not working, Greg enjoys spending time with his wife, kids and grandkids, watching sports, and gardening.

Aubrey Williams, PT, DPT

Aubrey Williams has been practicing physical therapy in outpatient orthopedics since graduating from the University of Florida in 2011 with a Doctorate Degree in Physical Therapy. Additionally, she received a Bachelor’s degree in Health Science from the University of Florida.
Aubrey employs a wide range of manual techniques when treating both non-operative and operative orthopedic conditions. These conditions can range from a distal-humerus fracture in a pediatric patient to age-related changes in the geriatric population. Aubrey enjoys creating programs pursuant to patient goals while educating patients and empowering them in the process to maximize mobility and function.
New to Colorado Springs, Aubrey enjoys time with her husband and their two daughters playing at the park, exploring the zoo and hiking around the area. During the fall season they enjoy cheering on the Florida Gators while watching college football.

Karen Meade, PT, DPT, CSCS

Karen Meade, PT, DPT, CSCS, brings a passion for fitness, athletics and sports medicine to the Security/ Fountain Action Potential Physical Therapy team.  Karen earned her Doctorate degree in Physical Therapy from Campbell University in Buies Creek, NC.  In addition, she has a Master’s degree in Biomedical Science as well as a Bachelor’s degree in Sports Medicine both from Colorado State University.  She also holds the CSCS, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, certification through the National Strength and Conditioning Association.  Karen enjoys treating a variety of patients and especially enjoys working with athletes and individuals recovering from surgeries. An avid CrossFit enthusiast and instructor, Karen is certified “CrossFit Level 1” and holds her “Clinical Management of the Fitness Athlete” certification. She is Rock Tape, Cupping, and Rock Blades (IASTM) certified as well. Whatever the condition or ailment she treats, Karen puts to good use her extensive continuing education and breadth of specialty certifications.  In her free time, you can find her hiking, doing CrossFit, working out at the gym or traveling with her husband, Isaac.

Fillmore

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • MS Physical Therapy
  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Andrew Fox PT, DPT, COMT, CERT.DN

Andrew Fox, PT, DPT, COMT, CERT.DN, earned his Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of Nevada Las Vegas in 2007 and holds a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from UNLV as well. He completed the ‘Certified Orthopedic Manipulative Therapist’ (COMT) post-graduate coursework, training, and testing through the Institute of Manipulative Physiotherapy and Clinical Training in 2015. Andrew especially enjoys treating elderly patients, individuals with total joint replacements, and patients with neurological disorders. When not working or studying, Andrew plays golf and enjoys the outdoors. More than anything, he treasures time with his wife and three small children.

Ashley Fuller PT, DPT

Ashley Fuller, PT, DPT, earned her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of South Florida School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, Morsani College of Medicine in Tampa, FL. Additionally, she holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. Ashley plans to pursue a post-doctoral certification in orthopedic manual therapy through the North American Institute. A dynamic and enthusiastic therapist, Ashley treats a variety of chronic and acute injuries and conditions and especially enjoys treating pediatric patients, from infants to teenagers. Ashley appreciates all outdoor activities including running and hiking and she also enjoys traveling, reading and spending time with family.

Downtown

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Functional Capacity Evaluation
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Hand Therapy
  • Headache Therapy
  • Job Site Evaluation
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Lift Testing / Task & Ability Evaluation
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Splint Custom Fabrication
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Rich Monaco PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, OCS, CERT.DN, DIPMT

Richard Monaco, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, OCS, CERT.DN, DIPMT, obtained his Doctorate of Physical Therapy in 2010 from Nazareth College in Rochester, NY. In addition, he holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology and Exercise Science from SUNY Cortland in Cortland, NY. Rich received his Strength and Conditioning Specialist Certification (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association, he is certified in Trigger Point Dry Needling, and he completed the Certified Orthopedic Manipulative Therapist post-graduate coursework, training, and testing through the Institute of Manipulative Physiotherapy and Clinical Training. Rich most recently completed his National Fellowship Certification. Rich operates from the perspective that physical therapy consists of equal parts manual therapy, for joint and soft tissue mobilization, and appropriate exercises, for maintenance and support. When not working or studying, Rich spends his time with his family and in the outdoors. He enjoys snowboarding, mountain biking, rock and ice climbing, and hiking and backpacking.

Don Bost ATC

Donald Bost, ATC, is a certified athletic trainer and Director of Action Potential’s Industrial Evaluation and Rehabilitation program. Don earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Athletic Training from Fort Lewis College in Durango, CO. Additionally, he studied Exercise Physiology at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL. Don is a member of the National Athletic Training Association and he is certified in the Blankenship Functional Capacity Evaluation System. Don’s breadth of experience in sports performance and worksite safety makes him an invaluable member of the Action Potential team. Prior to joining Action Potential, while with the “At A Glance Corporation,” in Sydney, NY, he was not only integral in helping the company secure a grant to create its Ergonomics Program, but he also then performed the employee ergonomic assessments and conducted worksite safety evaluations. At present, Don not only does ergonomic assessments, worksite evaluations, Functional Capacity Evaluations, and pre-placement screenings, but he also provides outstanding patient care, helping individuals to improve strength and conditioning. Don directs several sports performance programs locally and uses his expertise to help injured athletes return to action more quickly. In his free time, Don enjoys spending time with his wife and their five children.

Sandra Bost OTR, CHT

Sandra Bost, OTR, CHT is an Occupational Therapist and Certified Hand Therapist who has been an integral part of the Action Potential team since 1999. Sandy received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy from the University of Wisconsin Madison in Madison, WI in 1987. In 1994, after successfully completing thousands of hours working specifically with the hands, developing her expertise and honing her specialized skills, she earned the Certified Hand Therapist title. For over twenty years, Sandy has enjoyed treating patients with a variety of conditions affecting the hands and the entire upper quadrant of the body. Sandy has a comfortable and conversational approach, putting patients at ease as she listens to their concerns and employs the most suitable techniques to remedy the problem. As necessary, she creates customized splints to assist in the healing and recovery process. When not working, gardening, participating in and watching sports, and having fun with her family in every way possible top her list of favorite activities.

Suyasha Pai PT, Cert.DN

Suyasha Pai PT, Cert. DN has been a physical therapist for over 13 years. She completed her physical therapy education and training at the Sancheti Institute College of Physical Therapy, an acclaimed school in Pune, India. Her training includes all aspects of orthopedic physical therapy and rehabilitation, shoulder and hand specific rehabilitation, myofascial release and differential diagnosis techniques and skills. Additionally, she is certified in Trigger Point Dry Needling and trained in specialized Vestibular Rehabilitation concepts and practices. Suyasha truly loves working with senior patients and also has a special interest in treating patients with headaches, including migraines, those with TMJ problems and individuals with disorders of the foot and ankle. Throughout her career, Suyasha has been afforded the opportunity to work in diverse settings with a variety of patients. While in India, she worked in a facility specializing in knee rehabilitation, including the prevention of knee surgery and joint replacement. Since moving to the United States in 2007, Suyasha has worked in outpatient rehabilitation centers and traditional orthopedic facilities, in individual patient homes and in the clinical office setting. No matter the setting, she believes that “doing good to others is not just a duty, it is a joy!”  She loves her job and works to bring a smile to every patient she sees. Outside of work, she loves to spend time with her friends, travel the world with her family and enjoy nature. Her hobbies include painting, dancing, singing and listening to music.

Briargate

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Hand Therapy
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy

  • Multiple Sclerosis Physical Therapy
  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Parkinson’s Specific Therapy
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: children 6 yrs. & up
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Splint Custom Fabrication
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Melodie Colyar OTR, CHT

A Certified Hand Therapist for over twenty years, Melodie Colyar OTR, CHT, specializes in the treatment of all aspects of injuries to the upper quadrant. Melodie holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Occupational Therapy from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. Committed to constant professional growth, she has observed hours of hand and upper extremity surgery and has taken countless continuing education courses in order to stay current on surgical procedures and evolving evidence-based practices. She works closely with occupational medicine doctors, family practice physicians and hand surgeons and believes in a team-based approach to care. Melodie asserts that occupational therapy combines the art of rehabilitation with the science of healing and she takes pride in her ability to provide both, realizing the privilege of being a part of the healing process. Outside of work Melodie’s priority is caring for her children and extended family. She is also an avid runner.

Mark Leenheer PT, DPT, CMPT

Mark Leenheer graduated from Saint Louis University in 2015 with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. Following graduation, Mark completed a post-doctoral residency program with a focus in Orthopaedic Physical Therapy at the Cleveland VA Medical Center. A Certified Manual Physical Therapist through the North American Institute of Orthopaedic Manual Therapy, Mark is currently pursuing his Fellowship in manual physical therapy.  He is a certified practitioner of the Graston Technique, an instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization technique useful for treating myofascial restrictions and soft tissue adhesions, mobilizing scars, and promoting healing. Mark is a Cleveland, OH native and a passionate Cleveland sports fanatic. Additionally, he is a cyclist, skier, and trail runner.

Phil Plante PT, DSc, MTC, CMPT, COMT, FAAOMPT

Phil Plante founded Action Potential Physical Therapy in 1997 with the goal of providing world class physical therapy in a local setting. His passion for treating patients in the Colorado Springs community continues to this day. In addition to practicing physical therapy full time, Phil is a Fellow with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Therapists, providing advanced fellowship training to therapists from all over the nation. Phil holds his Doctor of Science in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, MI. Additionally, Phil has the elite title of Certified Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapist (Level 4) through the North American Institute of Orthopaedic Manual Therapists. He has a Master of Arts degree in Sports Science from the University of Denver in Denver, CO as well as a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Rockhurst College in Kansas City, MO. Phil earned his undergraduate degree in Community Health Education from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, CO. In his free time, he enjoys cycling, playing hockey, and fly fishing and relishes spending time with his wife, Eva, and their two daughters.

Kathryn Livingston PTA

Kathryn Livingston, licensed Physical Therapist Assistant, graduated from Pueblo Community College in 2017 with her Associates of Applied Science degree in Physical Therapy. Always up for a challenge and eager to learn to be the most skilled PTA possible, Kathryn joined Action Potential to work alongside the best. Beyond the traditional PTA curriculum, Kathryn specifically trained in Hippotherapy, the purposeful manipulation of equine movement as a physical and occupational therapy tool to engage sensory, neuro-motor, and cognitive systems, to promote functional outcomes. Working in the clinic without access to horses, Kathryn is committed to helping patients reach their functional and lifestyle goals and draws upon her diverse training and skills to do so, implementing unique evidence-based approaches to care as appropriate. Kathryn loves the fast paced, engaging and fun environment of out-patient physical therapy. She particularly relishes working with patients with sports injuries, those with neurological disorders, and the elderly population in general. Outside of work Kathryn enjoys horseback riding, dirt biking, camping, wakeboarding and any activities that involve being at the lake!

Austin Bluffs

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Astym
  • Back Pain Rehabilitation
  • Balance Therapy
  • Chronic Pain Physical Therapy
  • Dry Needling – Trigger Point Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessment
  • Fibromyalgia Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Foot Dysfunction Rehabilitation & Therapy
  • Gait Training & Re-training
  • Headache Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • MS Physical Therapy

  • Neuromuscular Re-education
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy: age 6 years+
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization / Myofascial Release
  • Spinal Mobilization
  • Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Surgical Rehabilitation / Pre & Post-Operative Care
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Conditioning / Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Workers Compensation Therapy

Rick Lambert PT, DPT, CERT.DN

Rick Lambert, PT, DPT, CERT.DN, has been practicing physical therapy for 15 years, emphasizing manual therapy, mobilization, manipulation and myofascial release, and exploring the neurophysiology of pain. Rick earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1997. He earned his Master’s Degree in Physical Therapy in 2001, and his Doctorate in Physical Therapy in 2005. Rick’s clinical approach consists of individualized treatment plans with an emphasis on hands-on physical therapy and a good dose of humor. Rick, his wife and their four children are thrilled to live in Colorado Springs and enjoy all the community has to offer. In his free time, he hikes, runs, swims, and travels.

Audrey Bauer PT, DPT

Audrey Bauer PT, DPT, is from Coppell, Texas and attended Abilene Christian University where she received a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Nutrition. She then attended Texas Woman’s University in Dallas where she received her Doctorate of Physical Therapy. She moved to Colorado Springs for the challenging work environment and because of her love of hiking, running, skiing, and enjoying all the outdoor adventures Colorado has to offer. With an interest in chronic pain and pain science as they relate to the orthopedic world of physical therapy, Audrey plans to continue a course of lifelong learning with an emphasis on chronic pain and manual therapy treatments that will most benefit her patients in the clinic.